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Rich and poor in Sao Paulo, Brazil. An increasingly common sight worldwide are slums next to wealthy enclaves. Researchers focused on tracking global health progress say measures must include social and economic factors. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

For today’s Humanosphere podcast, we’re talking with Ichiro Kawachi, a physician and epidemiologist at Harvard University about how growing wealth inequality is making us sicker.


News Rounds
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News in the Humanosphere: South Africa cracks down on illegal foreign workers

South African officials will inspect workplaces to see if firms are employing undocumented foreigners, the home affairs minister says. Malusi Gigaba added that more than 60 employees of retail chain Spar “without documentation” had been arrested. Gigaba warned that firms would be “penalized” if they breached the law, and said they should not fuel tensions by “playing locals against foreigners.”

Basics
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Wealthy countries turn back on leading anti-poverty solution: Remittances

The amount of money sent home by migrants and refugees from developing countries exceeds foreign aid – making migration a powerful anti-poverty, too. Despite this overwhelming evidence, countries are shutting their doors to foreigners. The effort by Western governments to limit the entry of migrants and refugees is fueled by nationalism and rising inequality … and a fair amount of misinformation.

Human Rights
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Human rights deteriorating as authoritarianism rises in Eastern Africa, report says

Conflict in the Horn of Africa and Great Lakes Region, along with increasingly authoritarian behavior by governments, has caused a rapid decline in human rights in countries across the region, a new report says. While authoritarianism appears on the rise in parts of the Western world as well, Amnesty International says this trend in Eastern Africa is particularly worrying.

News Rounds
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News in the Humanosphere: Mexico condemns Trump deportation drive

Mexico’s lead negotiator with the Trump administration is slamming new rules that call for deporting people living illegally in the U.S. to Mexico, regardless of whether they are citizens of that country. “I want to say clearly and emphatically that the government of Mexico and the Mexican people do not have to accept provisions that one government unilaterally wants to impose on the other,” Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray said Wednesday, according to Reuters.

Basics
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Internet is breaching barriers to education for the most vulnerable

Online schools in the U.S. may still be struggling to assert their legitimacy, but elsewhere, they’re being harnessed to provide access to quality education for the most vulnerable. The U.N. awarded two organizations yesterday for doing just that. One of those was JAAGO Foundation in Bangladesh, which brings qualified teachers to online and tradition classrooms in slums and remote areas.

Global Health
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Famine threatens the lives of 1.4 million children, U.N. warns

As many as 1.4 million children in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen are at risk of dying from famine, according to UNICEF. U.N. agencies are appealing for emergency support to help tens of millions of people suffering from hunger across the four countries, before they descend into famine. Famine was declared in parts of South Sudan on Monday. Formally invoking the world famine for the northern-central part of the country means that hunger is starting to kill people and will continue if nothing is done.

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