Map of the Day: Refugees Accepted by US States, Population Adjusted | 

In 2012, more than 87,000 people were resettled as refugees or granted asylum. People from Burma, Bhutan and Iraq made up more than 70% of the refugees arriving that year. The majority of US states take in refugees each year. Roughly 1 out of ever 5 refugees end up in the giant states of Texas and California.

However, adjusting for population, California and Texas are not overburdened.

Refugees per million residents yearly, 2009-12.
Refugees per million residents yearly, 2009-12.
Casey Cupp

This map by Casey Cupp is warped to show which states take on the highest number of refugees relative to their population. For example, the densely populated New Jersey takes in a far lower rate of refugees than that of the two Dakotas. What the map shows is that the distribution of refugees looks very different when considering state populations as opposed to strictly the number of people living in each state.

HT Cherokee Gothic

Data: Migration Policy Institue

  • Mike Johnson

    Many refugees in large cities like Seattle are in danger of becoming homeless, because they arrive traumatized, in culture-shock, with limited social support and with very little experience in writing and reading English. Often they are placed into apartments in suburban areas where they have difficulty finding work, especially if their only work experience is in agriculture. They are only given 3 months of financial support and help from a case worker, and then they are on their own. Oh, and let’s not forget that they owe the US government $10,000 for their plane flight to the USA! I think it’s really sad that we invite them into our country and then we give them so little support when they arrive. I think it’s an absolute tragedy that we can’t take better care of our country’s newest citizens.

    If anyone is looking for a way to make a huge impact in the world, start with the refugees in your own community. Volunteer to tutor them in English, start a Kickstarter for rent money, or petition your state government for more finances. Reach out to World Relief, IRC, or CRS to ask how you can help.

  • Mike Johnson

    Here is a great article about why measuring refugees in a specific region is so difficult, and why they so easily fall through the cracks. http://kuow.org/post/why-spike-king-countys-homeless-refugees-tough-measure