Contributors

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Ciara Long

Ciara Long is a freelance journalist covering politics, human rights and culture from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.2 Articles


Amy VanderZanden

Amy VanderZanden is a communications data specialist at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME).2 Articles


Sean McKee

Sean McKee is a policy translation specialist at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) in Seattle. Having worked extensively outside health-related professions, Sean’s objective is to connect policymakers, legislators, and other nonacademic audiences to the work of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risks Study. Contact him at smckee2@uw.edu.2 Articles


Dean Owen

Dean R. Owen is the senior manager for marketing and communications at the Seattle-based Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. He is in Durban for the launch of the first Global Burden of Disease 2015 study on HIV.2 Articles


Kevin Knodell is a multimedia journalist base in Tacoma, Wash. He's a senior news team member at Warisboring.com, where he was editor for the Iraq field team from June 2014 to April 2015. His work has also been featured at Vice, The Week, The (Tacoma) News Tribune, The Ft. Lewis Ranger and others. Reach him at knodelkj@gmail.com.2 Articles


Till Bruckner

Till Bruckner is an international development expert with a lively interest in transparency, accountability and the hidden power relationships that structure global politics and our everyday lives. He works part-time as advocacy manager for Transparify, an initiative promoting integrity in policy research and advocacy worldwide. He is currently based in Mauritania. Till maintains a regular blog at the Huffington Post: www.huffingtonpost.com/till-bruckner/1 Articles


Nancy Fullman

Nancy Fullman is a policy translation specialist at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), where she leads efforts to translate IHME’s research into actionable, policy-relevant materials and to engage stakeholders around the uses of global health evidence in decision-making. Nancy’s areas of expertise include malaria and other infectious diseases, impact evaluations and research around health service delivery. She received an MPH in health metrics and evaluation from the University of Washington.1 Articles


Kayla Albrecht

Kayla Albrecht, MPH, is a media relations officer at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) in Seattle. Her primary role is to provide journalists and other external audiences with the messages they need to tell compelling stories using IHME evidence and tools. Kayla holds an MPH in Health Promotion and Behavioral Science from the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth) and a BA in Journalism and Communication from the University of Oregon.1 Articles



Brendan Rigby

Brendan is a education specialist currently completing a PhD at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education. Brendan is studying the literacy practices of out-of-school children in Ghana, using participatory photography to document their transition through a Complementary Basic Education program into formal schooling. He is also a consultant for Plan International, Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority and UNICEF. Formerly, Brendan was an Education Officer with UNICEF in Ghana and Director of Venture Support for StartSomeGood. He is obsessed with American football, Chinese tea and running.1 Articles


Alanna Shaikh

Alanna Shaikh is an international development professional based in Cairo, Egypt, who has run programs in East Africa, Central Asia, and the Middle East (including four of the world’s most dangerous places). Shaikh also writes at the acclaimed blog Bloodandmilk.org1 Articles


Amy Maxmen

Amy Maxmen is a Brooklyn-based science journalist whose work appears in Nature, The Smithsonian, Nova/PBS and other outlets. This post derives from an investigation made possible through funds from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and Tiny Spark.1 Articles