News in the Humanosphere: Iraq’s Al Maliki fights for power, Ebola rages on, India’s poorest

Street art of Iraq PM Nouri Al Maliki. Thierry Ehrmann, Flickr

A Power Struggle in Iraq: Prime Minister Nouri Al Malaki has been ousted by a member of his own party, but he looks determined to put up a fight and plunge Iraq deeper into conflict. “President Obama welcomed the nomination of a new prime minister, Haider al-Abadi, interrupting his vacation on Martha’s Vineyard to announce in a televised statement that both he and Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. had congratulated Mr. Abadi on the phone, calling his nomination “an important step towards forming a new government that can unite Iraq’s different communities.”Although Mr. Maliki is widely reviled in Iraq, he remains a formidable force, with relatives who command special security forces, courts that are heavily shaped by his influence and a history of exacting revenge on his domestic opponents. Mr. Maliki’s stubbornness presents multiple challenges to the United States, which wants to preserve Iraq’s cohesion while helping to stop ISIS’ avowed goal of creating a monolithic Islamic caliphate that ignores national boundaries.” (NYTimes

The International Committee for the Red Cross is going to run an aid operation into Eastern Ukraine (ABC

Ebola Outbreak
Nigeria’s commercial capital Lagos has 10 confirmed cases of Ebola, up from seven at the last count, and two patients have died, including the Liberian who brought the virus in, the health minister said on Monday. (AlertNet

U.S. authorities have approved a request from Liberia’s government to send sample doses of the experimental ZMapp drug to treat Liberian doctors infected with Ebola, the Liberian presidency said. (AlertNet


India’s new government promised it would build more than five million new toilets within its first 100 days in office – the equivalent of constructing roughly one toilet every second. A video report from BBC

News Rounds courtesy of DAWNS Digest

Study: More poor people in India than in 26 African countries. A new analysis using the Multidimensional Poverty Index looked not just at income but also access to health, education, clean water, electricity and other basic services. (VOA

NATO will soon be forced to take a decision on a total pullout from Afghanistan unless a deadlock over the country’s election ends and a new president signs an agreement allowing foreign forces to stay, the head of the alliance said on Monday. (Reuters


The US government is contributing $10 million to the French-led operation against terrorist groups in the Sahel. (The Hill

At least 40,000 people who fled fighting in South Sudan are staying in horrific conditions at a UN camp for displaced people in Benitu. MSF is sounding an alarm. (BBC

The United States on Monday condemned South Sudan’s government and rebels for failing to form a transitional government by Sunday’s deadline, calling it “an outrage and an insult to their citizens.” (AlterNet

Britain’s Africa minister Mark Simmonds resigned on Monday, a spokesman for the prime minister’s Downing Street office said, becoming the second Foreign Office minister to quit in a week. (The Standard

Hamas may agree to letting Palestinian Authority police monitor the Rafa crossing into Egypt, potentially paving the way for an agreement that satisfy Hamas’ demand that Israel lift its blockade. (Jerusalem Post

The UN Human Rights Council named a three person commission of inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza. One of the commissioners included Amal Alamuddin who happens to be George Clooney’s fiancee. She turned down the appointment. (Time

Iraq has launched a polio immunization campaign aiming to protect over four million children under the age of 5 throughout the country against the crippling disease. (UNICEF

The Americas

Violence is what’s causing children to flee Central American countries. If it was mostly economic opportunity, says Center for American Progress, you would expect to see the same numbers from relatively stable but poor Nicaragua as much as Guatemala or Honduras, (CAP

Hillary Clinton sat down for an interview in which she appeared to make some sharp criticisms of Obama’s foreign policy. (The Atlantic


The Ebola Outbreak shows why the Global Health System is Broken, Charles Kenny (Bloomberg

A window is open — for now: Instability and opportunity in Myanmar (Devex

South Sudan and Somalia–a Tale of Two Famines (Daily Maverick

What You need to know about the UN’s Gaza War Crimes Investigation (UN Dispatch


About Author

Tom Paulson

Tom Paulson is founder and lead journalist at Humanosphere. Prior to operating this online news site, he reported on science,  medicine, health policy, aid and development for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Contact him at tom[at] or follow him on Twitter @tompaulson.