News in the Humanosphere: UNICEF to the UK: lead on effort to stop violence against children

Displaced Syrian boys and girl gather at their refugee camp during the visit of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Antonio Guterres and U.N. Development Program Administrator Helen Clark, in Deir al-Ahmar village, near Baalbek city, east Lebanon. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

“We see violence associated with armed gangs – particularly in Central America – but what’s shocking is that we’re really talking about everyday acts of violence, including sexual violence, corporal punishment, bullying in playgrounds, violence at the hands of a teacher and violence in the online community,” said [child protection chief, Susan Bissell].

“This is part of everyday life for children everywhere around the world. But none of it is inevitable: it is preventable. The wake-up call is to say this is happening in your backyard, this is happening around the corner, this is happening across the ocean and we need to take charge and do something about it.” (Guardian http://bit.ly/1sLkrPj)

Sweet, sweet freedom…Jeffrey Fowle, an American man held in North Korea for nearly six months, was set free. He was awaiting trial on charges of leaving a Bible at a nightclub in the northern port city of Chongjin last May. Big ups to the Swedish government for helping to negotiate Fowle’s release. http://yhoo.it/1wmIWD2)

WHO releases new TB report…The latest global data from the World Health Organization on tuberculosis is out today at 9:00 AM EST. You can access the report here starting at that time.

For a good laugh…Help by giving just a few cents (or just a whole lot more) (Humanosphere http://bit.ly/1s4kthf)

Ebola
After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said. (AP http://yhoo.it/1vIdbWP)

A UN staff member in Sierra Leone has died from Ebola, the third employee from the world organization to succumb to the deadly virus, the UN spokesman said. (AFP http://yhoo.it/1vI5foy)

The head of the World Health Organization says the agency will be upfront about its handling of the Ebola outbreak, following an internal report that details failures in containing the virus. (AP http://yhoo.it/1vI5KPp)

Sierra Leone’s first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. (VOA http://bit.ly/1sL8k4M)

The CDC is issuing new guidelines for how hospital workers should protect themselves from Ebola. The revised guidelines come after the virus spread from a Liberian traveler to two nurses in Texas. (NPR http://n.pr/1sL8Boh)

The hunt for an Ebola vaccine will produce data soon about whether two experimental vaccines are safe and could lead to larger medical trials in West Africa by January, a top World Health Organization official said Tuesday. (AP http://yhoo.it/1vI9yjH)

More than 3,000 people have signed up to work for MSF since the epidemic erupted in West Africa. (Guardian http://bit.ly/1sLkoTy)

France’s foreign minister pleaded for greater efforts to stem the spread of the Ebola virus, while pledging that France would intensify its measures in the hard-hit West African nation of Guinea. (AP http://yhoo.it/1tIKNoO)

The United Nations secretary-general is welcoming the cash and promises from countries in response to last week’s news that a U.N. trust fund for Ebola had only $100,000 in the bank. (AP http://yhoo.it/1wmIRPA)

Africa
Olympic and Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison on Tuesday for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1sL7dC4)

The Sahel region’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study. (TRF http://tmsnrt.rs/1tIKFpd)

Rape and other forms of sexual violence by all sides in South Sudan’s civil war have become so widespread that a 2-year-old child was among the victims, the U.N. special representative on sexual violence in armed conflict said. (Reuters http://bit.ly/1vI4jR5)

The United Nations said it is assisting six Central African countries in organizing synchronized vaccinations after Cameroon reported a fifth case of the wild polio virus in its territory.  (VOA http://bit.ly/1uAed2L)

The government of the Democratic Republic of Congo defended the expulsion of Scott Campbell, the director of the U.N. Joint Human Rights Office (UNJHRO). (VOA http://bit.ly/1sL7MvA)

Burkina Faso’s government will submit a bill for parliament to call a referendum on removing a two-term limit for the presidency, the interior minister said after a cabinet meeting on Tuesday. (Reuters http://bit.ly/1uAejaB)

A new study says the speed and severity of climatechange could cause major damage to small African farms. These farmers are already struggling to deal with the effects of climate change. (VOA http://bit.ly/1vI694i)

A US official confirmed that a ceasefire deal appeared to have been reached between Nigeria and Boko Haram militants, but said talks to release some 200 kidnapped girls were ongoing. (AFP http://yhoo.it/1vI6Lab)

MENA

The Islamic State and al-Qaida do not yet pose a threat to India, the national security adviser said on Tuesday, despite attempts by the ultra-radical groups to enlist support from among India’s huge Muslim population. (VOA http://bit.ly/1vI4MCG)

The U.S. air drop Sunday of new weapons and supplies to Kurdish fighters in the besieged border town of Kobani marks an important escalation in Washington’s efforts to “degrade and destroy” the Islamic State. (IPS http://bit.ly/1vI7jNp)

Morocco has announced that its first solar energy plant will begin operating next year. The plant is part of a multi-billion-dollar project aimed at satisfying the growing needs for energy in the North African kingdom. (VOA http://bit.ly/1vI8egK)

Thousands of Iraqi refugees in Lebanon face a daily struggle to survive because of a lack of jobs and the rising cost of food and accommodation, Caritas, a Catholic charity said on Tuesday. (TRF http://yhoo.it/1vIfwkq)

A man and a woman have been stoned to death for adultery in separate executions in jihadist-controlled areas of Syria, a monitoring group reported on Tuesday. (VOA http://bit.ly/1wmI5ST)

Asia

Myanmar’s government said Tuesday that a general election planned for late 2015 would be held on schedule, countering rumors that the vote could be postponed. (AP http://yhoo.it/1vI8Kvh)

Opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan hit an all-time high in 2013 despite years of counter-narcotics efforts that have cost the United States $7.6 billion, the U.S. government watchdog for Afghanistan reconstruction spending said on Tuesday. (Reuters http://yhoo.it/1sL9TQ9)

New Afghan President Ashraf Ghani signaled a new day for women in Afghanistan during his inauguration speech with a simple but emotional thank you to his wife  for her support and a promise that she will have influence in his presidency. (VOA http://bit.ly/1wmI4Ox)

The Americas
The United Nations’ top human rights official is calling for the immediate release of Leopoldo Lopez and dozens of other jailed opponents of Venezuela’s socialist government. (AP http://yhoo.it/1sL87yq)
Opinion/Blogs

Are 80 million potential voluntourists, slacktivists & DIY humanitarians the future of charity? (Aidnography http://bit.ly/10jIN9E)

5 reasons Turkey is dragging its feet in the fight against the Islamic State (GlobalPost http://bit.ly/1vI4rjs)

How labor unions can help beat Ebola (GlobalPost http://bit.ly/1sL7uVE)

UHC in Latin America: Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future (CGD http://bit.ly/1vI719c)

Dark Continent? How Africa’s Communications Revolution is Eroding Bad Press (IGD http://bit.ly/1vIfMA7)

“Why don’t they want our help?” Exploring the relationship between community and development worker (Participation, Power and Social Change Research http://bit.ly/1tIL5vQ)

How Not To Respond To The Ebola Panic, In 9 Easy Steps (BuzzFeed http://bzfd.it/1s4jDRI)

Six Reasons an Ebola Travel Ban Makes Us No Safer — and No Sense (CGD http://bit.ly/10jI4W2)

Let them drown (Roving Bandit http://bit.ly/1s4kiCJ)

In post-2015, as in life – it’s safety first (Global Dashboard http://bit.ly/1s4kjGW)

Research/Reports
“Water, Energy and the Arab Awakening,” a new book from an association of former world leaders, the InterAction Council, co-edited and published by the UN University Institute for Water, Environment and Health, explores dimensions of security from a range of angles and offers some uncommon conclusions. (IPS http://bit.ly/1uAeliI)
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About Author

Tom Murphy

Tom Murphy is a New Hampshire-based reporter for Humanosphere. Before joining Humanosphere, Tom founded and edited the aid blog A View From the Cave. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy, the Huffington Post, the Guardian, GlobalPost and Christian Science Monitor. He tweets at @viewfromthecave. Contact him at tmurphy[at]humanosphere.org.