News in the Humanosphere: Brazil Votes and President Dilma Rousseff Takes the Lead

(Credit: João de Bourbon)

A not exactly unexpected outcome. “Brazil’s president, Dilma Rousseff of the Workers Party, established a convincing lead in the first round of the country’s presidential election Sunday — but it was not enough to elect her outright. With just under 42 percent of the votes, Rousseff will meet Aécio Neves, the candidate from the center-right Brazilian Party for Social Democracy, who rode a growing wave of last-minute support, in a matchup Oct. 26. The late surge by Neves, who won 34 percent of the vote, carried him into the second round past Marina Silva, a “third way” candidate from the Brazilian Socialist Party, who just a few weeks ago was polling even with Rousseff.” (WaPo http://wapo.st/Z78N6z)

Why over $150,000 of protective equipment to fight ebola is stuck at the docks in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Hint: it has to do with politics and bureaucracy. (NYT http://nyti.ms/Z78d8Q)

Africa

The AU has sharply condemned the attack on Niger peacekeepers serving with the U.N. Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali. The attack left nine soldiers dead and others wounded during an ambush Friday in the West African country 15 kilometers east of Indelimane in Mali’s northern Gao region. (VOA http://bit.ly/1vEY91L)

African Union and Somali troops took control on Sunday of the al Shabaab militant stronghold of Barawe on the southern Somali coast, after the al Qaeda-linked militants fled without resistance, a Somali official said. (Reuters http://bit.ly/1vEZbuJ)

Health officials are looking to those who have recovered from Ebola to treat new cases. The World Health Organization hopes to find antibodies in the blood of people who have fought off the virus. (NPR http://n.pr/1uq1q6O)

In the first days of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, as aid workers and health authorities battled to contain the deadly virus, Mariano Lugli asked himself a simple question: where was the World Health Organization? (Reuters http://bit.ly/1vF02vz)

The stop-start talks between warring factions in South Sudan, which have borne little fruit since they began almost 10 months ago, were once again put on hold on Sunday, the government delegation announced. (AFP http://yhoo.it/1vF4hHp)

MENA

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas is expected to ask for $4 billion for Gaza, including for the rebuilding or repair of more than 60,000 homes and 5,000 businesses. (AP http://yhoo.it/1CNtrrn)

Britain says a teacher held hostage by militants in Libya has been released unharmed and reunited with his family after four months in captivity. (VOA http://bit.ly/1uq2ckd)

Turkish hospital gives glimpse of Syria horror as Islamic State advance (AFP http://yhoo.it/1uq9apr)

Asia

To prevent further violent incidents between protesters occupying sections of the city and angry residents, Hong Kong’s chief executive Saturday ordered pro democracy demonstrators to clear the streets starting today. (VOA http://bit.ly/1uq24Rz)

One of Southeast Asia’s strictest Islamic enclaves just got a lot more hostile to same-sex couples. In Aceh, the most orthodox corner of Muslim-majority Indonesia, gay sex is now punishable by 100 lashes. (GlobalPost http://bit.ly/1uq4GiC)

The Americas

Former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier has died of a heart attack. (VOA http://bit.ly/1vEXsWq)

Police in southern Mexico have found a mass grave, raising concerns that the site may contain the remains of more than 40 students missing since a rash of violence last week. (VOA http://bit.ly/1uq2nvK)

More than 142 million Brazilians went to the polls to choose the country’s next president, a federal parliament and state governors, following a dramatic election campaign. (BBC http://bbc.in/1vF0Yjs)

Opinion/Blogs

George Clooney, South Sudan and How the World’s Newest Nation Imploded (Newsweek http://bit.ly/1CNu2JU)

The new Washington consensus – time to fight rising inequality (The Guardian http://bit.ly/1s03GC0)

‘In 1976 I discovered Ebola, now I fear an unimaginable tragedy’ (The Observer http://bit.ly/1s03Jh5)

View on Disability: Are disabled kids in school after all? (SciDevNet http://bit.ly/1s051sp)

Focus on Gender: The dire impact of crises on women (SciDevNet http://bit.ly/1CNuzva)

Only a few aid agencies willing to help fight Ebola in Africa (The Globe and Mail http://bit.ly/1CNuSGp)

Mobilizing the Household Data Required to Progress Toward the SDGs (ODI http://bit.ly/1s07aEG)

Finding a Cure for Ebola (CGD http://bit.ly/1s07naQ)

Modi in the US: A truly strategic partnership? (The Interpreter http://bit.ly/1s08szx)

Thoughts on the Power of Civil Resistance (Dart Throwing Chimp http://bit.ly/1CNwlwo)

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About Author

Tom Murphy

Tom Murphy is a New Hampshire-based reporter for Humanosphere. Before joining Humanosphere, Tom founded and edited the aid blog A View From the Cave. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy, the Huffington Post, the Guardian, GlobalPost and Christian Science Monitor. He tweets at @viewfromthecave. Contact him at tmurphy[at]humanosphere.org.