News in the Humanosphere: Bodies of U.N. experts missing in DR Congo found

The United Nations and Congo must investigate after three bodies, including those of Swedish and American investigators with the United Nations, were found in central Congo, Sweden’s prime minister said Wednesday. Stefan Lofven said Sweden was “naturally ready to assist” in investigating the deaths of Swedish national Zaida Catalan, American Michael Sharp and their interpreter Betu Tshintela. Their bodies were found this week in a shallow grave. They went missing March 12 along with driver Isaac Kabuayi and two motorbike drivers while looking into large-scale violence and alleged human rights violations by the Congolese army and local militia groups in Central Kasai province. (AP https://yhoo.it/2o76Acc)

RIP Ahmed Kathrada…Leading South African anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada, one of Nelson Mandela’s closest colleagues in the long struggle against white rule, died early Tuesday aged 87, his eponymous charity foundation said. Kathrada was among those tried and jailed alongside Mandela in the Rivonia trial in 1964, which drew worldwide attention and highlighted the brutal legal system under the apartheid regime. (AFP https://yhoo.it/2ngncKR)

Top Stories

Four people drowned after the river Piura burst its banks in the north of Peru and caused extensive flooding. More than 500 people were evacuated from rooftops in the town of Catacaos after flood water levels rose to 5ft 9in. (BBC http://bbc.in/2nJoZv6)

Tanzanian President John Magufuli ordered the immediate release of a popular local musician, a day after he was arrested for allegedly mocking the government in a song. (Reuters http://bit.ly/2ngwOFk)

A top UN human rights group decided to investigate human rights abuses against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. (IPS http://bit.ly/2ngq8qX)

A recent spike in civilian casualties in Mosul suggests the U.S.-led coalition is not taking adequate precautions to prevent civilian deaths as it battles the Islamic State militants alongside Iraqi ground forces, Amnesty International said on Tuesday. (VOA http://bit.ly/2ng5uHd)

As the devastating civil war in Syria entered its seventh year last week, President Bashar al-Assad has continued to survive— despite faltering efforts by the United States and the UN Security Council to rein him in or impose sanctions on his beleaguered regime. (IPS http://bit.ly/2nxLa76)

Young people who reported sexual abuse by soldiers are still living on the streets in Central African Republic, despite political pledges they would be looked after. (Guardian http://bit.ly/2ngw2bp)

Pakistan has begun building a fence along its border with Afghanistan to curtail the movement of militants, its army said, in a move criticized by its eastern neighbor for dividing communities. (AFP https://yhoo.it/2ngnHVp)

There is more turmoil in the education field in Cameroon. Teachers in the country’s eight French-speaking regions have joined their colleagues on strike in its two English-speaking regions. Francophone teachers say they are owed salaries from as far back as seven years. (VOA http://bit.ly/2ngu7Ue)

MPs criticized the Department for International Development for closing aid programs based on negative media coverage and expressed concern over its handling of reputational risk. (Guardian http://bit.ly/2ngesEw)

Refugees in Greek camps are faced with many challenges, but those encountered by disabled refugees make an already difficult life even tougher. (VOA http://bit.ly/2ngiQ6k)

Opinion/Blogs

Cross-border surrogacy: exploiting low-income women as biological resources? (Guardian http://bit.ly/2nxdcj0)

Drought doesn’t cause famine. People do. (PRI’s The World http://bit.ly/2o3yshi)

What Is Left When Peru’s Flood Waters Recede? (VOA http://bit.ly/2nfWnGB)

Brexit As an Opportunity for Africa? (DW http://bit.ly/2ng1s1F)

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research (NPR http://n.pr/2o348mO)

Famine in Somalia: Twice in six years? (IRIN http://bit.ly/2nxsy6X)

Poor Farmers — Unlike Rich — Face Uphill Battle With Pakistan’s Climate Extremes (VOA http://bit.ly/2nxpCqX)

Trump is about to end Obama-era emissions cuts. How will CO2 emissions change? (PRI’s The World http://bit.ly/2ng2IC3)

Trapped: How northwestern Syria became a cage for hundreds of thousands of civilians (IRIN http://bit.ly/2nJvtKo)

In drought-stricken Somaliland, families try to survive on black tea (Reuters http://bit.ly/2nJnKvI)

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