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Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation team of Bill Gates, with Bill Gates Sr. and his sisters, Libby and Kristi, during their visit to a polio site in Seemapuri, India in November 2008. (Credit: Prashant Panjiar / RIBI Image Library / Flickr)

In its latest bid to crack down on foreign funding of civil society, the Indian government has revoked the license of one of the country’s largest public health organizations to accept foreign contributions. Largely funded by the government and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Delhi-based Public Health Foundation of India is a public-private partnership launched by the government in 2006.


Basics
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War-torn Colombia needs to reintegrate world’s highest rate of displaced citizens

According to the latest statistics from the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Colombia has the most internally displaced persons (IDP) in the world, with more than 6 million individuals — more than 13 percent of the national population — registered as of last year. As Colombia begins the implementation of its newly achieved peace deal, many experts have highlighted the urgent need to reintegrate millions of the country’s displaced people and refugees.

Human Rights
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Sri Lanka government to remove landfill after garbage mountain collapse kills dozens

For years, residents of a slum outside of Sri Lanka’s capital, Colombo, have been calling on the government to remove a massive and growing pile of garbage in a landfill next to their homes. A deadly dump landslide has finally spurred the government to act. Slums and garbage dumps tend to grow alongside each other everywhere, as the poor around the world erect homesteads on land unwanted by those with resources or choose to locate where they can harvest cast-off materials in the hope of eking out a meager income.

World Politics
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Japan begins to pull troops from South Sudan peacekeeping mission

Japan began withdrawing peacekeeping troops from South Sudan today, a U.N. official announced, amid escalating violence that some are now describing as genocide. The move is a setback for international support of the South Sudanese government and, symbolically at least, undermines Japan’s pledge to be a “proactive contributor to peace.”

Human Rights
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U.N. lauds Cuba for its progress against human trafficking

Cuba is making notable progress in the fight against human trafficking, according to the United Nations. United Nations Special Rapporteur Maria Grazia Giammarinaro praised Cuba’s “good practices” in combatting the global issue, crediting the country’s universal access to basic health care, educational and social security systems with reducing the social inequalities and vulnerabilities that can prompt people to flee the country and become victims to those who profit from trafficking.

Podcasts
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Polaris: On the front lines of fighting human trafficking

For today’s Humanosphere podcast, we’re talking with a leader in the battle to end human trafficking. Bradley Myles and his colleagues at Polaris has for the past 15 years concentrated his efforts on reducing, and ideally eliminating, a practice that unfortunately may be as old as human history: slavery and trade in human beings.

Human Rights
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Helping kids be kids could break longstanding cycles of violence

A number of studies show violence and conflict passes down to the next generation, and youth growing up in this environment have a difficult road ahead. Mercy Corps, however, believes that youth who when given safe spaces to learn, grow and socialize, can help solve the problems of generations of violence, poverty and instability in a country.

Basics
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U.N. re-ups historic famine warning as funding stagnates

The U.N. again warned that as many as 20 million people are at risk of famine in Nigeria, Yemen, South Sudan and Somalia. Warnings in February were not enough to raise the money needed to prevent a global hunger crisis. So, new attempts are being made to convince donor countries to do more.

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