China

Basics
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Top incomes, inequality in China ‘massively underestimated,’ new study reveals

China’s economic miracle has long been hailed as one of the biggest contributors to the fall in the global rate of extreme poverty. But now that growth is slowing and the country is working its way out of the “middle income trap,” economists have turned their focus toward the sharp inequality that latched onto China’s stunning growth. And according to a new study, it’s far worse than previously estimated.

Environment
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India’s coal plans could ‘single-handedly jeopardize’ Paris Agreement

As President Donald Trump decides in the next few weeks if he will pull the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement, India and China have said the world can look to them to uphold the pact. Although India has been making impressive strides to cut pollution and increase solar capacity in particular, a recent study says the country’s coal plans could “single-handedly jeopardize” the Paris Agreement.

Human Rights
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U.S. absent as 11 countries rebuke China for torture of human rights lawyers

Eleven countries have jointly called on the Chinese government to investigate “credible claims of torture” against human rights lawyers, the Globe and Mail reported yesterday. In a letter dated Feb. 27 – which the Canadian newspaper said has not been made public – the signatories also condemned China’s practice of detaining suspects in secret locations for long periods of time.

Global Health
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Vigilance required as bird flu cases surge, WHO says

A recent surge of bird flu infections in humans this season has alarmed scientists and public health officials. Although the risk of sustained transmission between humans remains low, the changing nature of influenza viruses requires close monitoring, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday.

Environment
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China to reallocate 500,000 coal, steel jobs as Trump promises revival

In his first speech to Congress last night, President Donald Trump reiterated his promise to roll back environmental regulations that, in his words, “threaten the future and livelihood of our great coal miners.” But across the Pacific, Trump’s great economic rival and largest coal producer in the world, China, announced a move in the opposite direction.

Basics
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China can still reverse inequality before it’s as bad as the U.S.

Income inequality in China is worse than previously estimated, according to a new paper published last week by the National Bureau of Economic Research. Still, it’s not as bad as the U.S. Estimates by the new World Wealth and Income Database (WID.world) – an ongoing project of the authors, economists Facundo Alvaredo, Lucas Chancel, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman – reveal that China’s richest 1 percent actually holds at least double the share of national income originally reported.

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