malaria

Science
1 Gates-backed test malaria vaccine is celebrated, half glass full

African child with cerebral malariaMike Urban An experimental malaria vaccine, made by GSK with backing and support on the research side from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Seattle-based PATH, has (again) been shown to protect half the children in the study were immunized against malaria. The results, announced…

Basics
0 What global health needs is more (value for) money

The Global Fund was, and is, one of the most hopeful, compassionate and impressive things the international community has done in a long time. That’s why it’s being celebrated in and around the grand UN confab this week. That’s why some cheered when Britain announced it would give another $1.6 billion this week, and it’s also why some are clamoring for even more funds – since many millions more are still not reached. But like most things we humans do when we rush in to fix something, it was also seriously flawed.

Global Health
0 Irrigation leads to better crops and more malaria

Mosquitoes and plants thrive where there is water. Farmers in arid regions who use irrigation systems to collect water also construct a mosquito breeding ground. New research shows that irrigation systems malaria prone areas can cause an increase in local malaria risk that lasts for more than a decade. Even…

Global Health
1 Fending off malnutrition in Chad, in Photos

Malnutrition takes a serious toll on children living in Chad. The vast West African nation features a fertile south and a cut off desert north. When rains do not fall or they fall too much crops are destroyed. Poor road systems make it very hard to get food into the…

Global Health
0 Malaria is a coiled spring

Flickr, ACJ1 The world has made great strides against malaria, bringing down the estimated global death toll from more than a million — mostly children — to about 650,000 per year today. That’s been done through a concerted and diversified strategy supported by the international community, through the Global Fund…

Social Business
0 Plan to produce synthetic anti-malaria drug criticized as “assault on farmers”

A decades’-long struggle to produce a synthetic version of one the world’s favored drugs for treating malaria, artemisinin, was celebrated as a victory for poor people. But now is being criticized as an assault on poor farmers. Global supply of artemisinin, which until now has been produced from harvest of the plant sweet wormwood, has been erratic in both quantity and supply. Hundreds of millions of people fall ill with malaria every year with an estimated 650,000 deaths — mostly in children.

The goal of this project, led by Seattle-based PATH in collaboration with the French drug firm Sanofi, was to supplement the global supply with this synthetic version. PATH officials told me that Sanofi’s ultimate production goal would likely only meet one-third of the global need, but the scientist who developed the synthetic drug said the goal is to totally replace dependence on the natural crop.

Social Business
0 PATH & Sanofi start major production of synthetic anti-malaria drug

Malaria remains one of the world’s biggest killers and also a massive economic drag on poor countries, poor families. One of our best weapons against this scourge is a drug known as artemisinin, which is harvested from the plant sweet wormwood and, as a crop, is about as predictable as corn or hog futures.A major new initiative to be launched tomorrow in Italy by Seattle-based PATH in collaboration with the French drug maker Sanofi aims to do industrial production of synthetic artemisinin.

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