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Scientists discover (again): AIDS treatment prevents infection | 

Flickr, Benny Sølz

As MSNBC, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and many other media report today:

People infected with the virus that causes AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate, scientists report.

The study, begun in 2005, was done by the National Institutes of Health and had such dramatically positive results it was ended five years early. As the Wall Street Journal’s Mark Schoofs writes:

The results were so overwhelming that an independent panel monitoring the research recommended the results be released four years before the large, multi-country study had been scheduled to end.

Connie Celum

What may be even more surprising is that a Seattle-based AIDS expert, Connie Celum, as well as some Swiss scientists had already discovered this!

Here’s my post on Celum’s findings last July, UW Study shows AIDS Treatment IS Prevention. As Celum and her team reported back then in The Lancet:

“We found a 92 percent reduction in transmission among those who went on (anti-HIV drug therapy),” said Celum.

The New York Times said the NIH study was convincing because it is the first time this was shown in a major randomized clinical trial and earlier studies had only “implied” this. That’s a little misleading and certainly ignores the power of what Celum and her colleagues showed. Continue reading