poverty

Human Rights
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Inaction on climate change could lead to a rise in human trafficking

The world is watching with anticipation today as President Donald Trump continues his first meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Without a set discussion agenda, the two leaders will presumably talk about trade, North Korea, and, after last night’s U.S. missile strike, Syria, among other topics. But less certain is whether or not they will broach the subject of climate change – a threat to global stability with far-reaching consequences, including human trafficking.

Social Business
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Babajob.com: Bridging the gap in India between the poor and better jobs

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi celebrated his party’s state election victories last month by describing his vision for a “new India” – one that “stands for development” by giving the poor a “leg-up, not a handout.” Offering a boost is India’s largest online job portal for entry-level and informal work, Babajob, which connects even illiterate low-skill workers to employers through digital technology.

Opinion/Analysis
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Gates Foundation’s rose-colored world view not supported by evidence

The annual public letter from Bill and Melinda Gates has become a much-celebrated event in the global development calendar. But the self-described ‘impatient optimists’ paint a picture that is so selective in its use of facts that it amounts to little more than propaganda for a failing industry, and indeed a failing ideology. The 2017 letter is especially striking for just how out-of-sync it feels with the current zeitgeist.

Basics
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What Jason Chaffetz gets wrong and the Pope gets right about poverty

Poverty is back in the headlines thanks to a pair of public figures. The comments illustrate divergent views, and only one is correct. “Americans have choices. And they’ve got to make a choice,” Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, told CNN. “So maybe, rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on, maybe they should invest that in health care. They’ve got to make those decisions themselves.”

Basics
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Wealthy countries turn back on leading anti-poverty solution: Remittances

The amount of money sent home by migrants and refugees from developing countries exceeds foreign aid – making migration a powerful anti-poverty, too. Despite this overwhelming evidence, countries are shutting their doors to foreigners. The effort by Western governments to limit the entry of migrants and refugees is fueled by nationalism and rising inequality … and a fair amount of misinformation.

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