Mexico moves with elegance toward our dietary future – eating more bugs

The idea here is to help address the growing global need for more food and more sources of food. Bugs, it turns out, are big in protein and not that unusual to see on the menu in many cultures.

As we’ve reported here before, the United Nations has encouraged all of us to expand our dietary range to include eating more insects.

Not by accident, like when they get ground into the peanut butter or embed themselves into a lettuce fold. No, the idea here is to help address the growing global need for more food and more sources of food. Bugs, it turns out, are big in protein and not that unusual to see on the menu in many cultures.

The Guardian reports that Mexico has taken this dietary admonition to heart, or gut, and has been able to succeed at moving it out of the realm of survival food (you know that goofy guy on TV who eats bugs in the wild) to haute cuisine. The story notes:

The San Juan market is Mexico City’s most famous deli of exotic meats, where an adventurous shopper can hunt down hard-to-find critters such as ostrich, wild boar and crocodile. Only the city zoo offers greater species diversity. But the priciest items in the market aren’t the armadillo steaks or even the bluefin tuna. That would be the frozen chicatanas – giant winged ants – at around $500 a kilo.

Here are a few graphics from our earlier story making the case for eating bugs:

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About Author

Tom Paulson

Tom Paulson is founder and lead journalist at Humanosphere. Prior to operating this online news site, he reported on science,  medicine, health policy, aid and development for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Contact him at tom[at]humanosphere.org or follow him on Twitter @tompaulson.